What's in your vise?

Norm Frechette

Googlemeister
Forum Supporter
Needlefly-Nymph-1080.jpg

Needlefly Nymph

Hook - Mustad 9672 or equivalent, size 8-10-12

Thread - Black

Tail - Brown hackle fibers (1½ gap widths past bend)

Body - Flat silver tinsel

Hackle - Mottled gray/brown rump feather from male ringneck pheasant, tied spey fashion as a wet fly collar

Head - Peacock herl

Originated by Dawn Holbrook.

The Book of Fly Patterns: Over 1,000 Patterns for the Construction of Artificial Flies - Eric Leiser
 

Squatchin

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
Needlefly-Nymph-1080.jpg

Needlefly Nymph

Hook - Mustad 9672 or equivalent, size 8-10-12

Thread - Black

Tail - Brown hackle fibers (1½ gap widths past bend)

Body - Flat silver tinsel

Hackle - Mottled gray/brown rump feather from male ringneck pheasant, tied spey fashion as a wet fly collar

Head - Peacock herl

Originated by Dawn Holbrook.

The Book of Fly Patterns: Over 1,000 Patterns for the Construction of Artificial Flies - Eric Leiser
I could easily see this as a small baitfish patterns.
 

Mike Cline

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
There are eight known species of leech in Montana (per Montana Field Guide). Most, if not all are predatory leeches that feed on other annelids and small aquatic insect invertebrates. (think typical midge larvae, mayfly larvae and small caddis pupa). Leeches are not uncommon in rivers that have any sort of slow backwaters. For the most part they are nocturnal but can occasionally be seen swimming in slow, shallow rivulets or backwaters during low light hours. Scientists who have studied leeches believe they will actively enter stream flows to feed when small invertebrates are plentiful. (Think your typical midge or small mayfly hatch). They are good swimmers. (see video). On recent trips to the upper meadows of the Gibbon River, mottled gray/green, brownish green and light gray leeches were a common sight in small pools and rivulets next to the river. A great number of the browns caught were regurgitating earthworms and leeches.

Swimming leech

Enter the simple Mini Pine Squirrel Zonker. These can be tied in just a few minutes each and replicate typical stream leeches extremely well.
BZN31349.JPG

BZN31341.JPG
A strip of zonked pine squirrel looks remarkably like the real thing (leech)
BZN31343.JPG
Two simple materials-- A strip of zonked pine squirrel and palmer chenille. Four steps:
1. Tie in the pine squirrel strip with the hair facing rearward at the hook bend.
2. Tie in the palmer chenille just in front of the pine squirrel, add a small drop of head cement and wind thread, then palmer chenille forward to within 1/4" of the hook eye.
3. Stretch the pine squirrel over the palmer chenille and secure with wraps 1/4" from the hook eye.
4. Wrap the pine squirrel strip twice around the hook shank and secure with thread wraps.
 
Last edited:

clarkman

average member
Forum Supporter
topwater with a removable head

1" block
mmE3IVH.jpg

v5RAa4X.jpg


3/4" block
92VLk1w.jpg

z6gVDP2.jpg
 

Norm Frechette

Googlemeister
Forum Supporter
Snow-Fly-Cluster-1080.jpg


Snow Fly Cluster

Griffiths Gnat Variation

Hook - Mustad 94840 or equivalent, size 14 -18

Thread - Gray

Hackle - Grizzly palmered through body

Body - Muskrat dubbing fur

This pattern, from Taylor Streit, is used on the Rio Grande in late November to represent a cluster of midges. The fly is very effective when these small flies are grouped together for “mating.”

The Book of Fly Patterns: Over 1,000 Patterns for the Construction of Artificial Flies - Eric Leiser

Many years ago, I fished a fly similar to this one but with a cream dubbed fur body and grizzly hackle on the Green River in Utah. That was one of my better days of fly fishing!
 

QuickreleaseEN

Steelhead
Sculpin pattern, name redacted. This one should have some kick and wiggle to it. I'd call the color palette "creative natural" on this one, I blended five different marabou colors and got creative with hackle and feathers and added a plethora of rubber legs. And of course no large sculpin pattern of mine is complete without the "angel wings" on the side- now standard issue is a double stack of stiff bent mallard flank, and here topped with a ruffed grouse flank. These push a LOT of water and compress/flare on the strip/pause, the higher the speed, the greater the effect. Pretty muted, not much flash save for three gold flashabou strands on each side and some ice dub underbody.

These will be hitting some choice undercuts soon.

IMG_0333.jpeg


IMG_0332.jpeg
 

Scottp

Life of the Party
Sickles’ Foam Hopper II

52142772141_da106a856d_c.jpg


52143256800_418715c8de_c.jpg


52142787238_b0843e7f15_c.jpg


52142772121_2a65a16dd1_c.jpg


hook - WFC Model 6 #6
thread - Uni 6/0 tan
underbody - 3mm x 3mm foam strip (tied on sides of hook only)
body - 1mm foam tan
underwing - Congo Hair shiner tan
wing - deer hair
head - 2mm foam tan
legs - medium rubber brown
indicator - 1mm foam orange

Regards,
Scott
 

Norm Frechette

Googlemeister
Forum Supporter
Caddis-Creeper-1080.jpg

Caddis Creeper

Hook - Mustad 9671 or equivalent, size10-14

Thread - Black

Tail - Two peacock sword fibers (one-quarter inch past bend)

Body - Rear third, peacock herl; middle third, yellow floss ribbed with gold wire; fore third, peacock herl

Wing - Three to four peacock sword fibers to bend

The Book of Fly Patterns: Over 1,000 Patterns for the Construction of Artificial Flies - Eric Leiser
 

Norm Frechette

Googlemeister
Forum Supporter
Wisconsin-Fancy-1080.jpg

Wisconsin Fancy

Hook - Mustad 94840 or equivalent, size 12-18

Thread - Black

Tail - Brown hackle fibers

Palmer rib - One brown and one grizzly hackle palmered through body

Body - Cream dubbing fur or ginger red fox dubbing

This pattern, listed in the Little Dixie Flies catalog, features a mixed hackle palmer rib, and is similar to the bivisibles except that it has no fronting collar.

The Book of Fly Patterns: Over 1,000 Patterns for the Construction of Artificial Flies - Eric Leiser
 
Top