What's in your cast iron tonight?

Mossback

Fear My Powerful Emojis 😆
Forum Supporter
Tough crowd here...
Lol
Trust me, they are in there chopped fine.
Used mushroom stock also.
 

Shad

Steelhead
Ya gotta add sugar (Cuts the acidity from the tomatoes - but you recipe sounds great)!!


cheers
No!!! Too much sugar is what fucks up every store-bought tomato product; especially spaghetti sauce. Quality tomatoes bring the appropriate level of sweetness. Use a little sugar to compensate for shitty tomatoes (like the ones we get where I live most of the time), but otherwise....
 

Mossback

Fear My Powerful Emojis 😆
Forum Supporter
Tomato sauce sure brings out the strong opinions...
Lol

We make a bit every year (not much this year because of not growing our usual 35 tomato plants) and like to do different styles for different uses.
Never add sugar, but some folks do...

Basic red sauce here if a mix of amish paste, cur di bue, roma and san marzano tomatoes cooked on the grill with a few slices of sweet onion and a bunch of peeled garlic cloves. Toss all that with olive oil and put in a grill basket then grill with lid covered on the low side of medium heat till tomatoes start to split and bubble, do not burn the garlic, so watch the temps. Golden brown on the garlic and onion, with some water cooked out of the tomatoes is all, maybe a hint of grill flavor but not a fire roasyed thing.Transfer to a large, deep fry pan (stainless here) peel and core the tomatoes, add about a 1/4 cup or so of olive oil and grab a potato masher and smash things up.
Cook down a while, till thickened a bit and then we run it through a blender, making things velvety and smooth as butter, then return to pan, add fresh basil and cook for 5 mins, then cool and freeze in freezer bags.
Add hot peppers for Arrabiata, or more seasonings for different stuff, but thats the process for us...
:)
It is very good, and sure goes well with some hot sausage, penne, and Chianti.
 

Cliff

Steelhead
Tomato sauce sure brings out the strong opinions...
Lol

We make a bit every year (not much this year because of not growing our usual 35 tomato plants) and like to do different styles for different uses.
Never add sugar, but some folks do...

Basic red sauce here if a mix of amish paste, cur di bue, roma and san marzano tomatoes cooked on the grill with a few slices of sweet onion and a bunch of peeled garlic cloves. Toss all that with olive oil and put in a grill basket then grill with lid covered on the low side of medium heat till tomatoes start to split and bubble, do not burn the garlic, so watch the temps. Golden brown on the garlic and onion, with some water cooked out of the tomatoes is all, maybe a hint of grill flavor but not a fire roasyed thing.Transfer to a large, deep fry pan (stainless here) peel and core the tomatoes, add about a 1/4 cup or so of olive oil and grab a potato masher and smash things up.
Cook down a while, till thickened a bit and then we run it through a blender, making things velvety and smooth as butter, then return to pan, add fresh basil and cook for 5 mins, then cool and freeze in freezer bags.
Add hot peppers for Arrabiata, or more seasonings for different stuff, but thats the process for us...
:)
It is very good, and sure goes well with some hot sausage, penne, and Chianti.
Man, that sounds so GOOD.
 

Mossback

Fear My Powerful Emojis 😆
Forum Supporter
After 6 years of serious tomato growing and various sauce recipes, we sort of settled on this recipe for the 'house red sauce'.
Everyone does different red sauce, and they are all fine...this is just our take on it.
I follow some Italian cooking groups and if you think beads vs. swing gets folks riled up, you should see the Italians go after each other on red sauce.
Locked threads and bannings...

🤣 🤣 🤣
 

Cliff

Steelhead
After 6 years of serious tomato growing and various sauce recipes, we sort of settled on this recipe for the 'house red sauce'.
Everyone does different red sauce, and they are all fine...this is just our take on it.
I follow some Italian cooking groups and if you think beads vs. swing gets folks riled up, you should see the Italians go after each other on red sauce.
Locked threads and bannings...

🤣 🤣 🤣
Mossback, I don't doubt it, but it's all greek to me because I get my "red" sauce out of a can. I'm only now beginning to experiment with my own sauce (still from cans, but with added fresh ingredients) but that's a start. It'll be a fun learning experience.
 

Mossback

Fear My Powerful Emojis 😆
Forum Supporter
Well many top shelf restaraunts use high quality canned tomatoes for their sauce, as they are canned at peak ripeness and the sauce is the same each time that way.
I use Cento San Marzano when I make 'Sunday Gravy', crush them by hand and do the whole Italian/American thing with pork bones, sausage, meatballs, wine and seasonings, fried tomato paste etc. that cooks all day...the sort of thing you make a huge batch of that you could feed an army of teenagers with.
It's damn good, and the sort of thing every family has a 'secret recipe' for, but like all cooking, the secret is quality ingredients handled well.

This is a pretty typical Sunday Gravy recipe, just add more of what you like and make it your own 'secret recipe'. It freezes fine, so make a mega batch the freeze portion sized amounts for later.



Sunday-Gravy-Ingredients.jpg

I mean, is there anything in this pic not to like ?
;)
 

Zak

Life of the Party
Forum Supporter
How do you get burnt on crusty stuff off of your cast iron, asking for a friend…
I boil water in it and then scrape it with a sturdy spatula.

A grinding wheel on an electric drill would also work; that's how I smoothed out the pebbly finish in my new Lodge CI wok.

Edit: several of my CI pans have burnt on crusty stuff on the outside, where stuff slopped over. I should take the grinding wheel to that.
 

FontinalisFin

Life of the Party
How do you get burnt on crusty stuff off of your cast iron, asking for a friend…
20220923_151847.jpg
Start with hot tap, or boiling water. Scrapey scrapey, scrubby scrubby, oily oily. Never use any oil removing detergent soaps like dawn etc. I have some shit quality lodge that are building up a nice season with this technique.
 

FontinalisFin

Life of the Party
I boil water in it and then scrape it with a sturdy spatula.

A grinding wheel on an electric drill would also work; that's how I smoothed out the pebbly finish in my new Lodge CI wok.

Edit: several of my CI pans have burnt on crusty stuff on the outside, where stuff slopped over. I should take the grinding wheel to that.
I need to sand my lodges, there's some good youtubes on turning them into a high quality product.
 

Zak

Life of the Party
Forum Supporter
I need to sand my lodges, there's some good youtubes on turning them into a high quality product.
I did it because the metal spatula on the pebbled surface is SO LOUD. I'm not sure that makes a difference to the nonstickyness
 
Top