Fly Vise w/ Inline Rotary vs. Rotary Function - How helpful is inline truly?

Aleforme

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
When it comes to rotary vises there's Nor-Vise and than everything else. Combined with Norm's auto-bobbins, it is a brilliant design and hella fun to use. The only 'downside' is it requires a 14" to 18" span between vise and bobbin post, so more suitable for a designated tying station.
I started on a crappy version of a Thompson model A that wouldn't hold a hook without superglue. Next vise was a regal, I loved that vise and used it for many years. Best thing about it is the speed loading a hook into it. never have to adjust the jaws, it just works. Mine could spin, but that was only to be able to see the other side or work from the bottom... mostly I used it just to look. My first rotary was a Griffin, and honestly I never got it. The rotation didn't do any more than another vise that I could rotate to see what I was doing. It gathered dust. Then I inherited a Norvise. Now this thing took some getting used to, I watched a few of Norms (RIP) videos and I found that I really liked this vise. Spinning dubbing loops was cool on it, ribbing is a whiz, any fly like wooly buggers that are basically tied in the round are extremely fast to tie on it, and you can lock it down quickly to tie in the conventional way, although I still like a conventional vise for the ergonomics of that. If the Norvise was the only vise I had though, it wouldn't suck.

The Nor-Vise is interesting for sure. The one concern I had was the fact the vise can only be horizontally and wondered if the vise shaft being straight behind the hook caused any issue with access? Maybe I'm overthinking it though. It's not like you need a lot of working space behind the actual bend of the hook in reality? I need to watch some video on this one.

I do see that once you add the based, the price for the standard vise starts getting up there. Could the vise and bobbin rest be installed easily on a homemade base? I have a heavy butcher block board that I use for a Wicked Edge sharpening system that might work. Save some money.

And, do most people use the standard inline jaws or would the offset fine point jaws be a good option?

Sorry for all the questions.
 

SurfnFish

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
The Nor-Vise is interesting for sure. The one concern I had was the fact the vise can only be horizontally and wondered if the vise shaft being straight behind the hook caused any issue with access? Maybe I'm overthinking it though. It's not like you need a lot of working space behind the actual bend of the hook in reality? I need to watch some video on this one.

I do see that once you add the based, the price for the standard vise starts getting up there. Could the vise and bobbin rest be installed easily on a homemade base? I have a heavy butcher block board that I use for a Wicked Edge sharpening system that might work. Save some money.

And, do most people use the standard inline jaws or would the offset fine point jaws be a good option?

Sorry for all the questions.
Plenty of space behind the jaws, a flick of the finger and turn the fly 360 degress, so always have access. I installed my Nor-Vise on both a tying table I built, as well as a 12" x 18" wood cutting board, worked great either way. Unless tying midge size frequently the standard jaws are fine, and if tying that small any simple clamp vice will work. Google Nor-Vise video and you'll them in action...as well as the auto-bobbins, which are killer..plenty of folks using the auto-bobbins with all kinds of vices
IMG_20171230_101552.jpg
 

RCF

Steelhead
IMHO it really depends on the type of flies you will be tying and the comfort level of tying them. I tie standard trout flies. I do not tie tube flies. One may be able to tie some flies more quickly with the rotary. Some do production tying so fast is important. For me, it is tying for the pleasure and relaxation as well as creativity.

I have had a number of vises, both inline rotary and rotational, in the last 40+ years. Like some others, I found I did not use/need the rotary feature much. Even rotational (seeing other side of fly) was not a mandatory but was nice to have sometimes.

I have big hands so being able to get at the materials easily is important to me. As my arthritis continues to set in it is even more important.

I started with the Regal and have gone back to the Regal. Easy access to materials, even some support for the hand while tying, comfortable tying position, simple to use and have fantastic jaws. I got the base version not the C-clamp version. I take my materials and vise everywhere I go and sometimes the C-clamp could not attach to the tables (so basically useless). If you go with a base version, get the heaviest one you can obtain.

As others have suggested, identify your needs, try them out, and see what fits best for you. It is an investment but high quality vises last a lifetime.
 

Guy Gregory

Semi-retired
Forum Supporter
I find the Nor-vise with either set of jaws (original or midge) really easy. And you can mount it on whatever, I've got mine on a board. But in short, any quality vise will help. A thing of beauty is a joy forever.
 

Aleforme

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
Plenty of space behind the jaws, a flick of the finger and turn the fly 360 degress, so always have access. I installed my Nor-Vise on both a tying table I built, as well as a 12" x 18" wood cutting board, worked great either way. Unless tying midge size frequently the standard jaws are fine, and if tying that small any simple clamp vice will work. Google Nor-Vise video and you'll them in action...as well as the auto-bobbins, which are killer..plenty of folks using the auto-bobbins with all kinds of vices
View attachment 15532

Well, my eyes are not the greatest so I probably won't be tying anything really small. Mainly Bugger, leaches, jig, etc. I do like that with the Nor-Vise and Regal, you can rest non tying hand on the vise when working. Small detail.
 

Aleforme

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
IMHO it really depends on the type of flies you will be tying and the comfort level of tying them. I tie standard trout flies. I do not tie tube flies. One may be able to tie some flies more quickly with the rotary. Some do production tying so fast is important. For me, it is tying for the pleasure and relaxation as well as creativity.

I have had a number of vises, both inline rotary and rotational, in the last 40+ years. Like some others, I found I did not use/need the rotary feature much. Even rotational (seeing other side of fly) was not a mandatory but was nice to have sometimes.

I have big hands so being able to get at the materials easily is important to me. As my arthritis continues to set in it is even more important.

I started with the Regal and have gone back to the Regal. Easy access to materials, even some support for the hand while tying, comfortable tying position, simple to use and have fantastic jaws. I got the base version not the C-clamp version. I take my materials and vise everywhere I go and sometimes the C-clamp could not attach to the tables (so basically useless). If you go with a base version, get the heaviest one you can obtain.

As others have suggested, identify your needs, try them out, and see what fits best for you. It is an investment but high quality vises last a lifetime.
Thanks man. I do agree that if I go with the Regal, I'm getting the heaviest base possible. I think that is one knock some have found with the standard Regal. A little tippy.
 
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SSPey

loco alto!
Forum Supporter
If you are focused on big stuff and want rotary, also check out the Renzetti Saltwater Clouser. The Saltwater is beefier, and the horizontal Clouser jaws give consistent hand access at any rotation. Only reason I am not using this is because my 30 year old Renzetti predates the Saltwater model. I did recently switch to the Clouser jaws (smaller ones, sized to mymvise). The Clouser jaws are nice if you mostly tie bigger stuff and rotate, as they interfere less with trailing materials. 6’5” with big hands.
 

RCF

Steelhead
Thanks man. I do agree that if I go with the Regal, I'm getting the heaviest base possible. I think that is one knock some have found with the standard Regal. A little tippy.
When I had other brands of vises, I bought a Regal bronze base to use. Just make sure the stem is correct diameter... :)
 

nwbobber

Steelhead
If I'm not using the rotary feature of a vise, I would rather tie on a vise that doesn't have it. I like the sloping angle up to the business end to rest my hand on. That being said if I had to give up the other vises, I would probably keep the Nor-vise. If you want to give the Griffin a try, and I can find it, I would let you have it, it's not doing me any good.
 

Aleforme

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
If you are focused on big stuff and want rotary, also check out the Renzetti Saltwater Clouser. The Saltwater is beefier, and the horizontal Clouser jaws give consistent hand access at any rotation. Only reason I am not using this is because my 30 year old Renzetti predates the Saltwater model. I did recently switch to the Clouser jaws (smaller ones, sized to mymvise). The Clouser jaws are nice if you mostly tie bigger stuff and rotate, as they interfere less with trailing materials. 6’5” with big hands.
Hmm, that's interesting, I'll have to check that out. Thanks.
 

Aleforme

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
If I'm not using the rotary feature of a vise, I would rather tie on a vise that doesn't have it. I like the sloping angle up to the business end to rest my hand on. That being said if I had to give up the other vises, I would probably keep the Nor-vise. If you want to give the Griffin a try, and I can find it, I would let you have it, it's not doing me any good.

Wow, that's very generous of you. But, I'd have to give you something for it and/or pay it forward to someone else at some point. If you do find it, let me know and we'll figure something out. Really appreciate it.

Jim
 

Aleforme

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
Found it. I like the idea of you paying it forward. I'm in Longview, but I'm pretty sure we will be making our way to West Seattle in the next couple of weeks, let me know what works for you.
That’s awesome man. I really appreciate it.

I’ll message you tomorrow and we can work out the details when the time comes. Came down with the Covid today so hitting the sack.

Very kind of you. The fishing gods are watching!

Jim
 

Old406Kid

Life of the Party
Forum Supporter
I'm with the OP on the clubs as hands .
For that reason I like vises with what I call a 'bigger crotch' which allows more room at the rear of the fly.
This Dyna King is a bit of a beast but my choice if I need the rotary function.
1653622757210.png

Not to knock anybody else's choices but this is the Peak in comparison.
1653622977595.png

My opinions could be biased due to the fact that way back when I started tying on these Thompson Pros and stiil use mine if I don't need the rotary function.:)

1653623285314.png
 
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Aleforme

Steelhead
Forum Supporter
I'm with the OP on the clubs as hands .
For that reason I like vises with what I call a 'bigger crotch' which allows more room to the rear of the fly
This Dyna King is a bit of a beast but my choice if I need the rotary function.
View attachment 15570

Not to knock anybody else's choices but this is the Peak in comparison.
View attachment 15571

My opinions could be biased due to the fact that way back when I started tying on these Thompson Pros and stiil use mine if I don't need the rotary function.:)

View attachment 15572

Wow, that Dyna King really stretches out.
 

Nick Clayton

Fishing Is Neat
Forum Supporter
For near the same money as a Traveler, I was not at all impressed with the Peak. To me it just feels clunky and I can't stand how much fiddling it takes to set a hook properly. They are fine vises, but to me they don't feel anywhere near as smooth in use as the Traveler. The Griffin Mongoose is another great vise in the same general budget range.

For me, also a guy with large hands, I find a V shaped, true rotary to provide WAY more room to work with than the straight shank Regal style. That's just me though.

The DK Baraccuda is the vise with, IMO, the most room to work with. A DK Trekker wouldn't be a bad way to go either. Same jaws and design with a different body and more plastic.

Ultimately I always advise people to actually tie on a vise before purchase. I feel it's very important to enjoy the feel of a vise. As mentioned, just like with fly rods, personal preference and feel is huge.

I see absolutely zero reason to not buy a true rotary vise. Even if you don't use it to wrap materials, being able to see all sides of a fly, invert for clousers and other such flies where you tie on the underside of the hook, and definitely when working with UV resin, the rotary function is huge. You can lock a rotary vise in place if you don't need the rotary function. You can't make a non rotary vise spin if you want it.
 

Snopro

Smolt
Even if you don't use it to wrap materials, being able to see all sides of a fly, invert for clousers and other such flies where you tie on the underside of the hook, and definitely when working with UV resin, the rotary function is huge.
You sum up why I'm looking to buy one even though my standard Regal has been excellent.
 
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