Adjustable Sighters

DerekWhipple

Steelhead
I'm the kind of guy that will fish a foot too shallow, for 2 hours, because a 2 minute tippet change is too hard.

When I read about using the "all sighter" leader, Devin Olson described using super light sighter material, and a much shorter tippet section, only two or three feet. With 5x sighter, you can dip it a foot or two in the water if you need to go deeper. A sighter that thin is a lot harder to see than the wax, though.
 

jaredoconnor

Peabrain Chub
Forum Supporter
I just had an idea of maybe sliding a few inch section of some type of braid over the tippet? Maybe the lightest dacron or gel spun you can get? Thread the tippet through that and use something tacky to get it to stay in place. Slide it up and down the tippet as needed.

I just thought of it reading this thread, so I don't know if it would be too heavy for 6 or 7x tippet, but I would think backing barrels would have more of an effect on your drift. Could also be a real pain to thread light tippet through it.

That is a neat idea, but it sounds like too much effort for a troglodyte like me!

When I read about using the "all sighter" leader, Devin Olson described using super light sighter material, and a much shorter tippet section, only two or three feet. With 5x sighter, you can dip it a foot or two in the water if you need to go deeper. A sighter that thin is a lot harder to see than the wax, though.

The problem with this is that all 5x sighter material I've found is weaker than my 5x fluoro, so I'm worried the sighter will break before the tippet. I have considered using 4x and I may roll with that, if the wax/paint annoys me too much.

Thanks for the input!
 

Pink Nighty

Life of the Party
Forum Supporter
All you guys using sighters and barrel knots might as well put the bobber on and stop pretending. All this wax is just power bait on your tippet, cant fool me! REAL fly fisherman use their 6th sense to feel the strike coming, before the fish even sees the fly. Its about intuition, gents, and you either got it or you dont.
 

Tom Butler

Grandpa, Small Stream Fanatic
Forum Supporter
All you guys using sighters and barrel knots might as well put the bobber on and stop pretending. All this wax is just power bait on your tippet, cant fool me! REAL fly fisherman use their 6th sense to feel the strike coming, before the fish even sees the fly. Its about intuition, gents, and you either got it or you dont.
I'm a poser, I admit it. I build a sighter into all my moving water leaders, even if I'm just swinging a brace of wets.
20220920_094502[1].jpg
The problem with this is that all 5x sighter material I've found is weaker than my 5x fluoro, so I'm worried the sighter will break before the tippet.
That annoys me as well, the nominal strength of the sighter is less than the same dia. tippet. I hate loosing it at the indicator/ring knot in a tree. But I catch trees as well as fish just fine using a sighter.
 

jaredoconnor

Peabrain Chub
Forum Supporter
I'm a poser, I admit it. I build a sighter into all my moving water leaders, even if I'm just swinging a brace of wets.
View attachment 33123

That annoys me as well, the nominal strength of the sighter is less than the same dia. tippet. I hate loosing it at the indicator/ring knot in a tree. But I catch trees as well as fish just fine using a sighter.

What do you use the sighter for, when not tight-lining?

I read about putting sighters on indicator rigs, but I don't understand the benefits.
 

Tom Butler

Grandpa, Small Stream Fanatic
Forum Supporter
What do you use the sighter for, when not tight-lining?

I read about putting sighters on indicator rigs, but I don't understand the benefits.
I like it for a reference, so I know exactly where in the stream my fly is. Even swinging flies I can often pick up the sighter and the adjust my drift to a rock or seam and have my fly presented where/exactly as I want. For me it's more precise than going off the end of the fly line and guessing where it is.
And when I get to log jam or something I want to do in a more true tightline style, I can just trim at the ring, tie on a different rig, and I'm going quickly.
 

Jake

Peamouth Chub
Forum Supporter
All you guys using sighters and barrel knots might as well put the bobber on and stop pretending. All this wax is just power bait on your tippet, cant fool me! REAL fly fisherman use their 6th sense to feel the strike coming, before the fish even sees the fly. Its about intuition, gents, and you either got it or you dont.
Which is why I just use electro-fishing gear and rotenone in rivers, and gill nets on the Sound. My intuition tells me there's fish there, the gear and rotenone gets them. Everything else is just faffing around.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy quiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
Forum Supporter
When fishing a high vis Tenkara fluorocarbon level line, the entire line is a sighter. However a single color can be obscured in specific lighting conditions so I bloodknot Orvis chartreuse-orange-white 0X sighter on the end of my lines that vastly increases line visibility under tricky lighting yet retains stealth with the white at the end in case the line dips under. A tippet ring is tied to the end of the sighter, and I tie 5X & smaller tippet to the ring. This describes exactly how I use a T-line and sighter.
I like it for a reference, so I know exactly where in the stream my fly is. Even swinging flies I can often pick up the sighter and the adjust my drift to a rock or seam and have my fly presented where/exactly as I want. For me it's more precise than going off the end of the fly line and guessing where it is.
And when I get to log jam or something I want to do in a more true tightline style, I can just trim at the ring, tie on a different rig, and I'm going quickly.
On the other hand Keiryu fishing uses live nymphs as bait with 14'-17'+ rods but short clear 3X fluoro lines and these Japanese Keiryu Yarn Markers are tied on the line above the water. I use the markers on DIY Keiryu clear fluoro lines and T-rods or a K-rod for maximum stealth when "tactical nymphing" with artificial flies. Here's a description of what Keiryu fishing is, what K-lines are, and how to tie the yarn markers on the line so they stay put.
The yarn seems to have no effect on casting even when fishing "Tenkara-style" with up to a 17' K-rod and 17' fluorocarbon level line. At least one of the 4 neon colors will stand out in virtually any lighting to detect where my fly is and any unusual movement that would indicate a strike. Unfortunately TBum, who I've been buying MIJ gear from since 2017, has been out of stock on a lot of items; these yarn markers included. The yarn is similar to egg yarn, but very small diameter strands.

Biostrike and the NZ yarn system have various problems, for tight-to-the-fly techniques. The closest thing that works is backing barrels, mentioned earlier. I did use them, for a while, but I slightly prefer the sighter wax.

What's the issue with NZ? I have a very inexpensive DIY version of the NZ indicator. $10 for a knit picker, a lifetime supply of clear Pony silicone bead lacing, and using (greased) wispy strands of orange, yellow, and white polypro macramé yarn that I use for tying stones and hoppers cast nicely with a western rod and fly line but didn't float very well when using weighted nymphs. I can't think of why it would not be good as a tight line indicator above the water.
 

Tom Butler

Grandpa, Small Stream Fanatic
Forum Supporter
When fishing a high vis Tenkara fluorocarbon level line, the entire line is a sighter. However a single color can be obscured in specific lighting conditions so I bloodknot Orvis chartreuse-orange-white 0X sighter on the end of my lines that vastly increases line visibility under tricky lighting yet retains stealth with the white at the end in case the line dips under. A tippet ring is tied to the end of the sighter, and I tie 5X & smaller tippet to the ring. This describes exactly how I use a T-line and sighter.

On the other hand Keiryu fishing uses live nymphs as bait with 14'-17'+ rods but short clear 3X fluoro lines and these Japanese Keiryu Yarn Markers are tied on the line above the water. I use the markers on DIY Keiryu clear fluoro lines and T-rods or a K-rod for maximum stealth when "tactical nymphing" with artificial flies. Here's a description of what Keiryu fishing is, what K-lines are, and how to tie the yarn markers on the line so they stay put.
The yarn seems to have no effect on casting even when fishing "Tenkara-style" with up to a 17' K-rod and 17' fluorocarbon level line. At least one of the 4 neon colors will stand out in virtually any lighting to detect where my fly is and any unusual movement that would indicate a strike. Unfortunately TBum, who I've been buying MIJ gear from since 2017, has been out of stock on a lot of items; these yarn markers included. The yarn is similar to egg yarn, but very small diameter strands.



What's the issue with NZ? I have a very inexpensive DIY version of the NZ indicator. $10 for a knit picker, a lifetime supply of clear Pony silicone bead lacing, and using (greased) wispy strands of orange, yellow, and white polypro macramé yarn that I use for tying stones and hoppers cast nicely with a western rod and fly line but didn't float very well when using weighted nymphs. I can't think of why it would not be good as a tight line indicator above the water.
I get the impression that some of us fish certain types of waters certain ways and our preference is to rely heavily on all the visual clues we can get, and there are lots of ways to increase that. That is kind of my initial comment to @jaredoconnor about following along with how it works out, because while I like what I do, there just might be something out there I'd like better if I keep an open mind.
 
Last edited:

jaredoconnor

Peabrain Chub
Forum Supporter
Which is why I just use electro-fishing gear and rotenone in rivers, and gill nets on the Sound. My intuition tells me there's fish there, the gear and rotenone gets them. Everything else is just faffing around.

I recently got hooked on a show called "Alone", where they go out in the wild and try to survive for as long as possible.

When they reel in 30" bull trout, using string and a lure that they carved out of wood, I feel like such a fucking failure. 😂
 

jaredoconnor

Peabrain Chub
Forum Supporter
What's the issue with NZ? I have a very inexpensive DIY version of the NZ indicator. $10 for a knit picker, a lifetime supply of clear Pony silicone bead lacing, and using (greased) wispy strands of orange, yellow, and white polypro macramé yarn that I use for tying stones and hoppers cast nicely with a western rod and fly line but didn't float very well when using weighted nymphs. I can't think of why it would not be good as a tight line indicator above the water.

The OG NZ system has two problems, in my opinion.

1. The tube kinks your tippet. People say it doesn't, so I persisted with it enough to be able to say that with conviction.

2. The tube holds more water (weight) than a Dorsey or even a Loon O-ring indicator.

It also requires the tool, which I don't like, but doesn't impact how it fishes. IMO, the Dorsey system is just an improvement on the NZ system; all the benefits and none of the flaws.

On that note, I ordered some razor foam and I'm going to experiment with making foam Dorseys. If I can get it to work, it would be a floatant free alternative.
 

Old Man

Just a useless Old Man.
Forum Legend
After reading all of this, I just discovered that I just got dumber. I usually just watch where my fly drifts to so I can pull in some slack and just toss it out there again. All you blind people seem to like making out that fly fishing is difficult. It REALLY isn't. Quit making it so. When I happen to be nymphing I just follow my line to the end of the drift. When it gets down stream from me I pull in some line and cast it out again. If you have a problem see your flies in/on the water, get your glasses changed. Simple.
 

mcswny

Life of the Party
Forum Supporter
After reading all of this, I just discovered that I just got dumber. I usually just watch where my fly drifts to so I can pull in some slack and just toss it out there again. All you blind people seem to like making out that fly fishing is difficult. It REALLY isn't. Quit making it so. When I happen to be nymphing I just follow my line to the end of the drift. When it gets down stream from me I pull in some line and cast it out again. If you have a problem see your flies in/on the water, get your glasses changed. Simple.

classic.
 

Jake

Peamouth Chub
Forum Supporter
After reading all of this, I just discovered that I just got dumber. I usually just watch where my fly drifts to so I can pull in some slack and just toss it out there again. All you blind people seem to like making out that fly fishing is difficult. It REALLY isn't. Quit making it so. When I happen to be nymphing I just follow my line to the end of the drift. When it gets down stream from me I pull in some line and cast it out again. If you have a problem see your flies in/on the water, get your glasses changed. Simple.
I agree. Furthermore, why the hell are y’all living in houses when caves are pre-built, mostly dry, and worked fine for thousands of years?

And don’t get me started on hunting techniques. A fire-hardened stick will kill anything that ya might care to eat.

Buncha damned spoiled millennials, hippies, and yuppies.
 

jaredoconnor

Peabrain Chub
Forum Supporter
I tested out another product and updated the post. I'm not going to test out any more products, because the last two are already better than what I was using.
 

clarkman

average member
Forum Supporter
If you must fish for trout the incorrect way, the bobbers below are best.

View attachment 32295

I'm curious, have you compared the smallest of these to the smallest of the washer losing Airlocks (I still don't think I've ever lost one, but I still carry extra washers just in case) for a weight bearing comparison? When I suspension nymph, I usually use the smallest airlock which will hold up a decent sized stone along with a smaller weighted nymph.
 

jaredoconnor

Peabrain Chub
Forum Supporter
I'm curious, have you compared the smallest of these to the smallest of the washer losing Airlocks (I still don't think I've ever lost one, but I still carry extra washers just in case) for a weight bearing comparison? When I suspension nymph, I usually use the smallest airlock which will hold up a decent sized stone along with a smaller weighted nymph.

They are roughly comparable, IMO. The main selling point of the Oros is that they don't spin around, like an Airlock.
 
Top